Fava Bean ‘Aprovecho’

Description

From Adaptive Seeds: “The legendary fava! The biggest fava bean seed we have ever seen and the taste is delicious. The giant plants yield heavily with pods containing four big green seeds each. The young leaves and shoots also make a delicious salad green. Nearly lost forever, or at least from commerce, this fava bean is one of the best and it was difficult tracking it down. We searched for years and found only two people that had any seed left. These last two sources were our friends Taylor Zeigler of Eugene, Oregon and Heike-Marie Eubanks of Myrtle Point, Oregon, two paragons of the Oregon seed saving scene. Selected for hardiness and flavor by Ianto Evans at Aprovecho Research Center in Cottage Grove, Oregon. Both Ianto and Aprovecho are pillars of the permaculture and appropriate technology movement.” Photo courtesy of Adaptive Seeds.
Care: Plant 8″ apart in rows spaced 1′ apart. Favas don’t do well in the heat; late spring through summer plantings are not recommended.

 

Fall Harvest variety

Late-season vegetables adapted to tolerate both the heat of late summer and the cool nights of fall. Harvest in late summer or fall. See our Fall & Winter Vegetable Guide for specific planting/harvest times & freeze-out temperatures.

Description

From Adaptive Seeds: “The legendary fava! The biggest fava bean seed we have ever seen and the taste is delicious. The giant plants yield heavily with pods containing four big green seeds each. The young leaves and shoots also make a delicious salad green. Nearly lost forever, or at least from commerce, this fava bean is one of the best and it was difficult tracking it down. We searched for years and found only two people that had any seed left. These last two sources were our friends Taylor Zeigler of Eugene, Oregon and Heike-Marie Eubanks of Myrtle Point, Oregon, two paragons of the Oregon seed saving scene. Selected for hardiness and flavor by Ianto Evans at Aprovecho Research Center in Cottage Grove, Oregon. Both Ianto and Aprovecho are pillars of the permaculture and appropriate technology movement.” Photo courtesy of Adaptive Seeds.
Care: Plant 8″ apart in rows spaced 1′ apart. Favas don’t do well in the heat; late spring through summer plantings are not recommended.

 

Fall Harvest variety

Late-season vegetables adapted to tolerate both the heat of late summer and the cool nights of fall. Harvest in late summer or fall. See our Fall & Winter Vegetable Guide for specific planting/harvest times & freeze-out temperatures.

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