Sweet Coltsfoot (Petasites japonicus)

Description

Petasites japonicus, commonly known as butterbur, fuki or sweet coltsfoot, is noted for its huge basal leaves that form dense spreading clumps of foliage to 3’ tall and 5’ wide. Native to Korea, China and Japan, where it is typically found growing on wet streambanks in woodland areas. Long-stalked, lightly toothed, kidney-shaped, green leaves (16-32” wide). Fragrant, yellowish-white, daisy-like flowers in dense corymbs appear in spring before the leaves emerge on rigid scapes to 6” tall. Scapes elongate after bloom. Leaf stalks (petioles) are eaten as a vegetable (fuki) in Japan. Easily grown in consistently moist to wet soils in part shade to full shade. If grown in full sun, leaves will typically wilt during hot days in somewhat the same manner as with the ligularias. Best grown at the shoreline of large natural ponds, on the banks of streams or in bogs. Tolerates a wide range of soils as long as consistent moisture is present. Photos courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden.
 
Sweet-Coltsfoot

Petasites japonicus, commonly known as butterbur, fuki or sweet coltsfoot, is noted for its huge basal leaves that form dense spreading clumps of foliage to 3’ tall and 5’ wide. Native to Korea, China and Japan, where it is typically found growing on wet streambanks in woodland areas. Long-stalked, lightly toothed, kidney-shaped, green leaves (16-32” wide). Fragrant, yellowish-white, daisy-like flowers in dense corymbs appear in spring before the leaves emerge on rigid scapes to 6” tall. Scapes elongate after bloom. Leaf stalks (petioles) are eaten as a vegetable (fuki) in Japan. Easily grown in consistently moist to wet soils in part shade to full shade. If grown in full sun, leaves will typically wilt during hot days in somewhat the same manner as with the ligularias. Best grown at the shoreline of large natural ponds, on the banks of streams or in bogs. Tolerates a wide range of soils as long as consistent moisture is present. Photos courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden.
 
Sweet-Coltsfoot