Lovage (Levisticum officinale)

Description

Levisticum officinale, commonly called lovage, is a culinary herb that is often grown in herb gardens for the celery-like flavor of its leaves, stems, roots and seeds. Small umbels of tiny, greenish-yellow flowers appear in spring. Deeply divided, dark green leaves resemble flattened parsley or celery leaves. Leaves are used in flavoring salads, soups, sauces, stews and vegetables. Seeds are used in meat dishes, casseroles and soups. Roots can be grated for use in salads or used to make tea. Although lovage is primarily considered an herb, the stems can be blanched and used as a vegetable. Oil was formerly used in Europe in the preparation of a love potion, hence its name. Periodic hard cut-back of some stems during the growing season will encourage production of a continuing supply of fresh, new leaves. Easily self-seeds if seeds are not harvested or otherwise removed. Grows to 6 feet. Full sun to part shade. Photo courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden.
 
Lovage

Levisticum officinale, commonly called lovage, is a culinary herb that is often grown in herb gardens for the celery-like flavor of its leaves, stems, roots and seeds. Small umbels of tiny, greenish-yellow flowers appear in spring. Deeply divided, dark green leaves resemble flattened parsley or celery leaves. Leaves are used in flavoring salads, soups, sauces, stews and vegetables. Seeds are used in meat dishes, casseroles and soups. Roots can be grated for use in salads or used to make tea. Although lovage is primarily considered an herb, the stems can be blanched and used as a vegetable. Oil was formerly used in Europe in the preparation of a love potion, hence its name. Periodic hard cut-back of some stems during the growing season will encourage production of a continuing supply of fresh, new leaves. Easily self-seeds if seeds are not harvested or otherwise removed. Grows to 6 feet. Full sun to part shade. Photo courtesy of Missouri Botanical Garden.
 
Lovage