HYSSOP Hyssopus officinalis

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

Description

Hyssop is an evergreen perennial with a bushy, 2 foot tall growth habit and spikes of blue-purple flowers in mid to late summer. Plants can be shaped to form hedges, and thrive in sun and light soil

Traditional Healing Uses: Hyssop has been used primarily to relieve coughs, bronchitis, colds, and fevers, and also to lower blood pressure, increase circulation, and aid digestion. It has served as a vermifuge, as a gargle for sore throats and cold sores, and as a remedy for herpes simplex. The leaves have been used in poultices for wounds and bruises.

Other Uses: Suggested culinary uses are as a seasoning in chicken soup, poultry stuffing, lamb stew, and sausage. Hyssop flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to the garden. Plants repel flea beetles and cabbage moths from nearby vegetables.

Harvest: Collect the flowering tops and leaves in August and dry in the sun.

Preparation: Pour a cup of boiling water on 2-3 teaspoons of dried herb and infuse for 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day. Hyssop tea is sometimes combined with horehound for coughs, and with peppermint for colds.

Product Description

Hyssop is an evergreen perennial with a bushy, 2 foot tall growth habit and spikes of blue-purple flowers in mid to late summer. Plants can be shaped to form hedges, and thrive in sun and light soil

Traditional Healing Uses: Hyssop has been used primarily to relieve coughs, bronchitis, colds, and fevers, and also to lower blood pressure, increase circulation, and aid digestion. It has served as a vermifuge, as a gargle for sore throats and cold sores, and as a remedy for herpes simplex. The leaves have been used in poultices for wounds and bruises.

Other Uses: Suggested culinary uses are as a seasoning in chicken soup, poultry stuffing, lamb stew, and sausage. Hyssop flowers attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds to the garden. Plants repel flea beetles and cabbage moths from nearby vegetables.

Harvest: Collect the flowering tops and leaves in August and dry in the sun.

Preparation: Pour a cup of boiling water on 2-3 teaspoons of dried herb and infuse for 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day. Hyssop tea is sometimes combined with horehound for coughs, and with peppermint for colds.