SWEET VIOLET Viola odorata

Sweet Violet (Viola odorata)

Description

Scented flowers bloom in spring on 8 inch evergreen perennials that thrive in moist soil and are partial to shade.

Traditional Healing Uses: Violet leaves, high in vitamins A and C, have traditionally been used as a remedy for cancer, tumors, cysts, stressed nerves, headaches, eczema, rheumatism, and urinary infections. Violet leaves have been regarded as a cancer preventative. Violet flower syrup has been used as a cough remedy and mild laxative. Crushed leaves have been applied to wounds, swellings, and tumors.

Other Uses: Violet flowers can be used raw in salads and garnishes, or to tint and flavor vinegar. Violet flower jam, jelly, wine, and syrup are tasty, and blossoms are sometimes crystallized in sugar. Young violet leaves are good in salads, and older ones steamed with other potherbs.

Harvest: Fresh leaves are best, and are available year-round, but leaves can also be gathered and dried in early spring. Flowers may be dried or preserved in syrup.

Preparation: Pour 1 cup boiling water over 1 teaspoon of leaves and let steep for 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day.

Caution: Violet seeds may cause vomiting.

Product Description

Scented flowers bloom in spring on 8 inch evergreen perennials that thrive in moist soil and are partial to shade.

Traditional Healing Uses: Violet leaves, high in vitamins A and C, have traditionally been used as a remedy for cancer, tumors, cysts, stressed nerves, headaches, eczema, rheumatism, and urinary infections. Violet leaves have been regarded as a cancer preventative. Violet flower syrup has been used as a cough remedy and mild laxative. Crushed leaves have been applied to wounds, swellings, and tumors.

Other Uses: Violet flowers can be used raw in salads and garnishes, or to tint and flavor vinegar. Violet flower jam, jelly, wine, and syrup are tasty, and blossoms are sometimes crystallized in sugar. Young violet leaves are good in salads, and older ones steamed with other potherbs.

Harvest: Fresh leaves are best, and are available year-round, but leaves can also be gathered and dried in early spring. Flowers may be dried or preserved in syrup.

Preparation: Pour 1 cup boiling water over 1 teaspoon of leaves and let steep for 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day.

Caution: Violet seeds may cause vomiting.