LUNGWORT Pulmonaria officinalis

Lungwort (Pulmonaria officinalis)

Description

Lungwort, a perennial up to 12 inches tall, grows in sun or partial shade. One of its names is “spotted dog,” because of its silver-spotted evergreen leaves, and another name is “yesterday, today, and tomorrow,” because flowers open pink then turn to blue. Medieval people thought its leaves resembled lungs, and would therefore be good remedies for lung ailments.

Traditional Healing Uses: The most important traditional uses of lungwort tea have been to relieve coughs, bronchitis, hoarseness, chest congestion, and catarrh, as well as to alleviate diarrhea, flatulence, and hemorrhoids. Externally, the leaves have been applied to cuts and wounds.

Harvest: Collect and dry leaves during and after flowering, in spring and summer.

Preparation: Pour boiling water on 1-2 teaspoons of dried leaves and infuse 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day.

Product Description

Lungwort, a perennial up to 12 inches tall, grows in sun or partial shade. One of its names is “spotted dog,” because of its silver-spotted evergreen leaves, and another name is “yesterday, today, and tomorrow,” because flowers open pink then turn to blue. Medieval people thought its leaves resembled lungs, and would therefore be good remedies for lung ailments.

Traditional Healing Uses: The most important traditional uses of lungwort tea have been to relieve coughs, bronchitis, hoarseness, chest congestion, and catarrh, as well as to alleviate diarrhea, flatulence, and hemorrhoids. Externally, the leaves have been applied to cuts and wounds.

Harvest: Collect and dry leaves during and after flowering, in spring and summer.

Preparation: Pour boiling water on 1-2 teaspoons of dried leaves and infuse 10-15 minutes, 3 times a day.