Culantro (Eryngium foetidum)

Culantro (Eryngium foetidum)

Description

Also known as Mexican coriander, this exceptionally tasty perennial herb has a flavor profile similar to cilantro, although it’s a more intense taste than typical cilantro. In some cases, culantro is called cilantro de hoja ancha (wide-leaf cilantro in Spanish), to distinguish it from cilantro (Coriandrum sativum). If you’re using a recipe that calls for cilantro, try some culantro instead!

Culantro has also been reputed to have medicinal value, as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic.

Plants should be set out after last frost. Space 4 – 6 inches with 6 inches apart between rows. For best flavor, harvest your culantro before it starts to flower (which can cause the leaves to become tough).

Culantro prefers to be planted in shade; planting it in sun will result in smaller plants that flower sooner than their happier, larger, in-the-shade cousins.

Photo from Wikipedia

Product Description

Also known as Mexican coriander, this exceptionally tasty perennial herb has a flavor profile similar to cilantro, although it’s a more intense taste than typical cilantro. In some cases, culantro is called cilantro de hoja ancha (wide-leaf cilantro in Spanish), to distinguish it from cilantro (Coriandrum sativum). If you’re using a recipe that calls for cilantro, try some culantro instead!

Culantro has also been reputed to have medicinal value, as an anti-inflammatory and analgesic.

Plants should be set out after last frost. Space 4 – 6 inches with 6 inches apart between rows. For best flavor, harvest your culantro before it starts to flower (which can cause the leaves to become tough).

Culantro prefers to be planted in shade; planting it in sun will result in smaller plants that flower sooner than their happier, larger, in-the-shade cousins.

Photo from Wikipedia